Posts tagged mlb

aroldis_chapman

Cubs get Chapman from Yanks in blockbuster

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By Carrie Muskat / MLB.com | July 25th, 2016

CHICAGO — The Cubs hope to have secured a trip to the World Series by adding hard-throwing closer Aroldis Chapman to the mix.

The Cubs acquired Chapman from the Yankees on Monday in exchange for four players: pitcher Adam Warren and prospects Gleyber Torres, Billy McKinney and Rashad Crawford. Torres, a 19-year-old shortstop, was the top-ranked prospect in the Cubs’ system and ranks 24th in baseball according to MLB Pipeline.

Chapman, 28, has the highest strikeout rate per nine innings in baseball, and his fastball was recently clocked at 105 mph. The left-hander has a 2.01 ERA in with 20 saves in 21 opportunities for the Yankees.

Chapman began this season serving a 30-game suspension covered by Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy

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Griffeys

Trey Griffey, Son of Ken Griffey Jr., Selected by Mariners on Day 3

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Associated Press | June 11, 2016

NEW YORK — The Seattle Mariners have themselves another Griffey who makes fantastic catches. This one, though, does it on the gridiron instead of the outfield.

Trey Griffey, the son of Hall of Fame outfielder Ken Griffey Jr., was selected Saturday in the Major League Baseball draft by the Mariners in the 24th round — fittingly, his father’s old team and jersey number.

It appears the pick on the draft’s final day was simply the Mariners paying homage to their former star. The younger Griffey is a wide receiver at the University of Arizona, but hasn’t played baseball competitively since before high school.

The 6-foot-3, 209-pounder certainly has the athleticism of his dad, though, catching 11 passes for 284 yards, including a 95-yard touchdown grab as a redshirt junior, last season. The Mariners listed him as a center fielder, just More >

Burke Waldron

A 92-year-old WWII vet threw our favorite Memorial Day first pitch

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Big League Stew

On Memorial Day, Major League Baseball shows its appreciation for the country and its veterans. This season, teams wore camouflage jerseys and caps, and a number of current and former military personnel threw out first pitches. 

While a number of our veterans acquitted themselves well when it comes to the national pastime, our favorite Memorial Day first pitch came courtesy of Burke Waldron. Waldron, a 92-year-old World War II veteran, threw out the first pitch prior to Sunday’s Seattle Mariners game.

As the Mariners announced just prior to Waldron taking the field, the 92-year-old navy veteran began his military service in 1943. He served at Pearl Harbor for some time, and retired from the military in 1946 as a petty officer, 2nd class.

Waldron is apparently 92 years old, but he could have More >

MLB Cuba

MLB’s Goal is a Safer Pipeline From Cuba

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Pedro Gomez | MLB

Relations between the U.S. and Cuba have moved closer to being normalized, a point that will be further underscored Tuesday when the Tampa Bay Rays play the Cuban national team in Havana.

So everything must be open, right? Well, no. At least, not yet. But there are definitely signs indicating change — real change — could be forthcoming.

Cuban baseball players must still defect to have the opportunity to play in the major leagues, and that remains a thorny issue for Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association. The defections of the Gourriel brothers, Yulieski and Lourdes, last month signaled how nothing has really changed.

“If we could make a deal to resolve this problem, it would attract a lot of attention,” MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said. “I can’t say we are close. It’s a very uncomfortable position for us to be in. I More >

Baseball Safety

Why Baseball Needs Dugout-to-Dugout Safety Nets

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Fans scrambling to get out of the way of batted balls is a common sight at baseball games, one that more protective netting could help eliminate. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

 Katie Strang, ESPN.com | Jan. 19, 2016

Editor’s note: In the days leading up to Jan. 25, Rob Manfred’s one-year anniversary as MLB commissioner, we asked our writers to offer one change or innovation they would make to improve baseball if the sport started over today.

The change: Major League Baseball requires protective netting at all ballparks belonging to its member clubs. Dugout to dugout. Plain and simple.

Already, the league has taken an important step in this direction, but there remains a critical distinction from the current policy to the one proposed here. Last month, MLB announced that, after an in-depth study, the league recommends teams to employ protective netting between the near-ends of both dugouts More >

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