An anti-aging clinic in Miami listed the names of prominent baseball players — including Alex Rodriguez, Melky Cabrera, Nelson Cruz and Gio Gonzalez — and detail performance-enhancing drugs administered to them and others, according to a report Tuesday by the Miami New Times.

The names were on records Miami New Times said were given to it by an employee who worked at Biogenesis of America before it closed last month. Miami New Times reported that the records show the firm sold performance-enhancing drugs, including human growth hormone, testosterone and anabolic steroids.

Anthony Bosch, the 49-year-old head of the clinic, was connected to Manny Ramirez when the former MLB star was suspended for 50 games for violating baseball’s drug policy in 2009. Bosch has never been charged by local or federal officials.

 

Miami New Times said it conducted a three-month investigation before releasing its 5,400-word story online on Tuesday.

 

Rodriguez, the New York Yankees slugger who ended 2012 injured and on the bench during the playoffs, has admitted to using steroids from 2001 to ’03, but he has said he has not used PEDs since. The New Times report said that Rodriguez’s name shows up 16 times in the records it reviewed. One record, which the newspaper reported was part of Bosch’s private notebooks, indicated Rodriguez paid Bosch $3,500 for “1.5/1.5 HGH (sports perf.), creams test., glut., MIC, supplement, sports perf. Diet.” HGH is banned by MLB.

There are other notations for Rodriguez as well, beginning in 2009 and continuing through last season. The New Times report states that other drugs listed for Rodriguez include IGF-1, a banned substance that stimulates insulin production and muscle growth, GHRP, a substance that releases growth hormones, and testosterone creams. According to the report, Bosch openly bragged of supplying drugs to Rodriguez.

Rodriguez had hip surgery last month and is expected to miss some or all of the 2013 season.

The Yankees issued a statement Tuesday, saying: “We fully support the Commissioner’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. This matter is now in the hands of the Commissioner’s Office. We will have no further comment until that investigation has concluded.”

Miami New Times reported that Cabrera, who signed a $16 million free-agent contract with the Toronto Blue Jays during the offseason, is mentioned 14 times in the report. He was suspended in August 2012 for violating baseball’s performance-enhancing drugs policy while a member of the San Francisco Giants. The paper cited entries in April 2012 indicating Cabrera “has enough meds until May 4” and indicating what the paper terms a “cocktail of drugs including IGF-1.”

 

Major League Baseball issued a lengthy statement Tuesday in response to the New Times story.

 

“We are always extremely disappointed to learn of potential links between players and the use of performance-enhancing substances,” the statement begins. “These developments, however, provide evidence of the comprehensive nature of our anti-drug efforts.  Through our Department of Investigations, we have been actively involved in the issues in South Florida.  It is also important to note that three of the players allegedly involved have already been disciplined under the Joint Drug Program.”